Asian American council since 1984, asianamericancounil.org, HIV, AIDS Information, 30 Tips for Emergency Preparedness, New Questions and Answers for Naturalization Test, Test, New Citizenship, AAC,

Oshell Oh Oshell Oh



Oshell Oh
Oshell Oh
 
Total 17, New 0
   

Telemarketing Fraud

Writer : acc Date : 2013-07-24 (We) 20:22 Clicks : 4158


The following are some of the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from being victimized. Visit our White-Collar Crime and Cyber webpages for more fraud schemes.

To report cases of fraud, use our online tips form or contact your nearest FBI office or overseas office.

Telemarketing Fraud

When you send money to people you do not know personally or give personal or financial information to unknown callers, you increase your chances of becoming a victim of telemarketing fraud.

Here are some warning signs of telemarketing fraud—what a caller may tell you:

  • “You must act ‘now’ or the offer won’t be good.”
  • “You’ve won a ‘free’ gift, vacation, or prize.” But you have to pay for “postage and handling” or other charges.
  • “You must send money, give a credit card or bank account number, or have a check picked up by courier.” You may hear this before you have had a chance to consider the offer carefully.
  • “You don’t need to check out the company with anyone.” The callers say you do not need to speak to anyone including your family, lawyer, accountant, local Better Business Bureau, or consumer protection agency.
  • “You don’t need any written information about their company or their references.”
  • “You can’t afford to miss this ‘high-profit, no-risk’ offer.”

If you hear these or similar “lines” from a telephone salesperson, just say “no thank you” and hang up the telephone.

Tips for Avoiding Telemarketing Fraud:

It’s very difficult to get your money back if you’ve been cheated over the telephone. Before you buy anything by telephone, remember:

  • Don’t buy from an unfamiliar company. Legitimate businesses understand that you want more information about their company and are happy to comply.
  • Always ask for and wait until you receive written material about any offer or charity. If you get brochures about costly investments, ask someone whose financial advice you trust to review them. But, unfortunately, beware—not everything written down is true.
  • Always check out unfamiliar companies with your local consumer protection agency, Better Business Bureau, state attorney general, the National Fraud Information Center, or other watchdog groups. Unfortunately, not all bad businesses can be identified through these organizations.
  • Obtain a salesperson’s name, business identity, telephone number, street address, mailing address, and business license number before you transact business. Some con artists give out false names, telephone numbers, addresses, and business license numbers. Verify the accuracy of these items.
  • Before you give money to a charity or make an investment, find out what percentage of the money is paid in commissions and what percentage actually goes to the charity or investment.
  • Before you send money, ask yourself a simple question. “What guarantee do I really have that this solicitor will use my money in the manner we agreed upon?”
  • Don’t pay in advance for services. Pay services only after they are delivered.
  • Be wary of companies that want to send a messenger to your home to pick up money, claiming it is part of their service to you. In reality, they are taking your money without leaving any trace of who they are or where they can be reached.
  • Always take your time making a decision. Legitimate companies won’t pressure you to make a snap decision.
  • Don’t pay for a “free prize.” If a caller tells you the payment is for taxes, he or she is violating federal law.
  • Before you receive your next sales pitch, decide what your limits are—the kinds of financial information you will and won’t give out on the telephone.
  • Be sure to talk over big investments offered by telephone salespeople with a trusted friend, family member, or financial advisor. It’s never rude to wait and think about an offer.
  • Never respond to an offer you don’t understand thoroughly.
  • Never send money or give out personal information such as credit card numbers and expiration dates, bank account numbers, dates of birth, or social security numbers to unfamiliar companies or unknown persons.
  • Be aware that your personal information is often brokered to telemarketers through third parties.
  • If you have been victimized once, be wary of persons who call offering to help you recover your losses for a fee paid in advance.
  • If you have information about a fraud, report it to state, local, or federal law enforcement agencies.

For More information: 
Telemarketing Fraud Targeting Seniors

back to top

Nigerian Letter or “419” Fraud

Nigerian letter frauds combine the threat of impersonation fraud with a variation of an advance fee scheme in which a letter mailed from Nigeria offers the recipient the “opportunity” to share in a percentage of millions of dollars that the author—a self-proclaimed government official—is trying to transfer illegally out of Nigeria. The recipient is encouraged to send information to the author, such as blank letterhead stationery, bank name and account numbers, and other identifying information using a fax number provided in the letter. Some of these letters have also been received via e-mail through the Internet. The scheme relies on convincing a willing victim, who has demonstrated a “propensity for larceny” by responding to the invitation, to send money to the author of the letter in Nigeria in several installments of increasing amounts for a variety of reasons.

Payment of taxes, bribes to government officials, and legal fees are often described in great detail with the promise that all expenses will be reimbursed as soon as the funds are spirited out of Nigeria. In actuality, the millions of dollars do not exist, and the victim eventually ends up with nothing but loss. Once the victim stops sending money, the perpetrators have been known to use the personal information and checks that they received to impersonate the victim, draining bank accounts and credit card balances. While such an invitation impresses most law-abiding citizens as a laughable hoax, millions of dollars in losses are caused by these schemes annually. Some victims have been lured to Nigeria, where they have been imprisoned against their will along with losing large sums of money. The Nigerian government is not sympathetic to victims of these schemes, since the victim actually conspires to remove funds from Nigeria in a manner that is contrary to Nigerian law. The schemes themselves violate section 419 of the Nigerian criminal code, hence the label “419 fraud.”

Tips for Avoiding Nigerian Letter or “419” Fraud:

  • If you receive a letter from Nigeria asking you to send personal or banking information, do not reply in any manner. Send the letter to the U.S. Secret Service, your local FBI office, or the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. You can also register a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission’s Complaint Assistant.
  • If you know someone who is corresponding in one of these schemes, encourage that person to contact the FBI or the U.S. Secret Service as soon as possible.
  • Be skeptical of individuals representing themselves as Nigerian or foreign government officials asking for your help in placing large sums of money in overseas bank accounts.
  • Do not believe the promise of large sums of money for your cooperation.
  • Guard your account information carefully.

For More information: 
Related Online Rental Ads Scheme
Related Spanish Lottery Scam

back to top

Identity Theft

Identity theft occurs when someone assumes your identity to perform a fraud or other criminal act. Criminals can get the information they need to assume your identity from a variety of sources, including by stealing your wallet, rifling through your trash, or by compromising your credit or bank information. They may approach you in person, by telephone, or on the Internet and ask you for the information.

The sources of information about you are so numerous that you cannot prevent the theft of your identity. But you can minimize your risk of loss by following a few simple hints.

Tips for Avoiding Identity Theft:

  • Never throw away ATM receipts, credit statements, credit cards, or bank statements in a usable form.

   

Total:17, New 0
Number Title Writer Date Like
17
NATIONAL WILDFIRE COMMUNITY PREPAREDNESS DAY …
acc 02-20 1170
16
The Ombudsman's Annual Report to Congress By statute, the Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman submits an Annua…
acc 07-03 1266
15
Fire causes Appliances and electrical Clothes Dryer Fires in Residential Buildings (2008-2010) PDF 612 KB Residential Building Electrical Fi…
acc 04-24 1278
14
Coffee Break Training: Preparing for an Insurance Services Office Visit, Part 1   A community will often inquire as to how it can best pre…
acc 04-08 1506
13
   Public Fire Education Planning — A Five-step Process — Step 1: Conduct a Community Risk Analysis No. FM-2014-2 January 9, 2…
acc 01-10 1941
12
I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker Form I-129 (778 KB PDF) Instructions for Form I-129 (208 KB PDF) Option…
acc 12-27 2190
11
Chief of Community Affairs Thomas M. Chan    Chief of Community Affairs Thomas M. Chan was appointed to the New York City Police Department …
acc 10-26 3584
10
Proclamation -- National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 2013 National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 2013 - - - - - - - By the Pr…
acc 10-01 1932
9
 THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary   For Immediate Release August 30, 2013 NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH, 2013 …
acc 09-11 1959
8
USCIS reminds you that authorization for the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) program for Iraqi nationals who worked for or on behalf of the Unite…
acc 08-30 3054
7
News Release OFCCP News Release: [08/27/2013]Contact Name: Laura McGinnis or Mike TrupoPhone Number: (202) 693-4653 or x6588Email: McGinnis.Laur…
acc 08-28 2235
6
The following are some of the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from being victimized. Visit our White-Col…
acc 07-24 4159
5
Tips for Parents: The Truth About Club Drugs What Are Raves? “Raves” are high energy, all-night dances that feature hard pounding techno-music a…
acc 07-24 3915
4
How to File a Charge of Employment Discrimination Note: Federal employees and job applicants have a different complaint process. You may file a…
acc 07-21 2501
3
Assembly Members Peter J. Abbate, Jr. Thomas J. Abinanti Carmen E. Arroyo Assembly District 2 Assembly District 53 Assembly District 86 J…
acc 07-20 2635
2
SENATORS Adams, Eric Addabbo, Joseph P., Jr Avella, Tony Ball, Greg Bonacic, John J. Boyle, Philip M. Breslin, Neil D. Carlucci, David De…
acc 07-20 2529
1
NYPD | Precincts - Transit Districts - Housing PSAs Manhattan 1st Precinct  (212) 334-0611…
acc 07-20 3728


pic700ReviselastminimumbyOshellOh2014soct2.jpg


The 29th  Annual Inaugural Ceremonies 


Honorable Barack Obama

President of the United States of America

Honorable Andrew M. Cuomo

Governor of the New York State

Honorable Michael R. Bloomberg

The Mayor of the City of New York

Honorable Richard A. Brown

District Attorney Queens County

Honorable Raymond W. Kelly

Police Commissioner City of New York


The Asian American Council

Michael S. Limb

Executive Chairman


*************

Together we can become more

Innovative, Adaptive and Creative

In solving today’s problems

 

AsianAmericanCouncil.org

 

Reception committee Co-Chairmen

01) Tomiko Abe                    Co-Chairman of the Tokyo Chapter of the AAC

02) Dr. Louis Fujimoto         Chairman of the Japanese Affairs Committee

03) James Fan                       Director of the Chinese Affairs Committee

04) David Ignacio, Esq.        Chairman of the Filipino Affairs Committee

05) Richie Ian                        Chairman of the   Caribbean Affairs Committee

06) Mohummad Iqubal       Chairman of the International Affairs Committee

07) Lisa Su Li                         Chairman of the Inter Governmental Affairs Committee

08) Young Chul Lee             Co-Chairman of the Korean Affairs Queens Committee

09) Qasim Majeed                 Chairman of the Event Committee

10) Pea Young Ho                Co-Chairman of the Korean Business Affairs Committee

11) Jae Hack Sin                   Co-Chairman of the Korean Business Affairs  Committee

12) James Sheng                  Director of the Chinese Business Affairs Committee

13) Gun  Soo Youn               Chairman of the Korean Affairs Committee

14) Wu, Kuan He                  Chairman of the Chinese Business Affairs Queens Committee

15) Oshell Oh                       Communication Director of the International  Affairs Committee    

16) Rafael Flores                Director of Central America Affair Committee         

 

The Asian American Council

Request the Honor of Your Presence

At

The Twenty Ninth Annual Inaugural Ceremonies

And

Anniversary Dinner Reception

On

Oct. 23rd, 2013

At

Good Fortune Restaurant (Former East Manor) Banquet Hall

46-45 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, New York 11355

Tel 1-718-326-8988

Business Attire

Cocktail Reception                                           at 6:00 P.M.

Official Anniversary Ceremony                 at 7:00 P.M.

Dinner Reception                                             at 8:00 P.M.

R. S.V.P.

Michael S. Limb

Executive Chairman

The Asian American Council
Website: AsianAmericanCouncil.org

Tel: 718-820-0300 Cell: 917-279-7410 Fax 718-820-0700

E-mail:   limb300@hotmail.

 
 

Copyright ⓒAll rights reserved. AsianAmericanCouncil.org

The Asian American Council
Michael S. Limb Executive Chairman
Web Producer: by AAC Communication Director Oshell Oh

159-16 Union Tpke. Suite # 212 Fresh Meadows, New York 11366 email: office@asianamerciancouncil.org